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Special needs

Special needs

  • Coping with paralysis

    If your dog suffers an injury or disease resulting in paralysis (an inability to use one or more limbs, usually due to a spinal cord injury), this can be very distressing, and force you to make some difficult decisions. Many owners choose to have their dog put to sleep and this is a very personal decision to be talked through carefully with your vet.

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  • Coping with deafness

    Deafness may be present from birth in dogs, or be acquired later in life as the result of a traumatic injury or disease, or related to aging changes of the senses. Surprisingly, dogs cope very well with loss hearing with certain changes to the way they are looked after.

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  • Coping with blindness

    Blindness may be present from birth in dogs, or be acquired later in life as the result of a traumatic injury or disease, or related to aging changes of the senses. Surprisingly, dogs cope very well with loss of sight with certain changes to the way they are looked after.

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  • Coping with amputation

    Amputation may often be the best option for animals with severe injuries from car accidents, or for those suffering from bone cancer or other serious diseases. Although it involves major surgery, amputation can actually help dogs, rather than hinder them, by removing their source of pain and suffering. Most dogs will adjust to life on three legs with your help and your vet’s advice.

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  • Recovering from surgery

    Your vet will give you specific advice relating to your dog's particular condition, check up dates and post-surgical medication, always follow their instructions and contact them if you are not sure about something or have any concerns. In general, dogs will be a little sleepy after an anaesthetic, however, they should be eating and comfortable with no sign of pain.

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  • What is cognitive dysfunction syndrome?

    As a rule, senior dogs tend to sleep for longer and slow things down in comparison to their younger or middle-aged years. However, some older dogs also start displaying changes in their behaviour that appear abnormal. Until recently such changes had been attributed to the aging process, for which little could be done. More recent thinking, however, attributes these changes to a disorder called Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS).

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  • Special diets

    Over the past 20 years huge progress has been made in the development of highly specialised pet food formulas. These range from weight loss and sensitive digestion recipes, to diets designed specifically to help manage conditions such as diabetes, urinary or skin problems. Some formulations work to support treatment over a limited period of time, but others can help your pet for life.

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