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Senior dogs

Senior dogs

  • Is your dog a senior yet?

    None of us like to think of our dogs getting older, after all they’re a huge part of the family. But it’s important to remember that signs of ageing are not always readily visible. As dogs enter their senior years internal changes start to take place and their metabolism begins to slow down.

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  • Discover your dog's health age

    There is a wide breed variation in what constitutes older age as generally speaking, small dogs live the longest, while large and giant breeds have relatively short lifespans. A dog will become a senior between 5 and 9 years old, depending on its breed size.

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  • Expert advice on senior dogs

    There’s no exact age when dogs become seniors. Just like people it tends to be more of a gradual change. There is a wide breed variation in what constitutes older age as generally speaking, small dogs live the longest, while large and giant breeds have relatively short lifespans. A dog will become a senior between 5 and 9 years old, depending on its breed size.

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  • Looking after your senior dog

    Dogs’ needs change as they grow older, both physically and emotionally. Different breeds age at different rates, but sooner or later the grey hairs start appearing, but there’s no reason why the later years shouldn’t be the most rewarding of all. After all, you know each other so much better, so make sure you’re ready for the change.

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  • Caring for your senior dog

    Even though your dog may be slowing down a little, there's no reason why the later years in life shouldn't be some of the most rewarding. After all, he's wiser as well as older. With regular veterinary attention, daily care and proper nutrition, your senior dog can still experience a very happy, healthy life.

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  • How to feed your senior dog

    In general, dogs of seven years and older start taking life a bit easier and, as a result, their nutritional needs begin to change once more. Senior dogs are less active and have a slower metabolism, so can be even more prone to gaining weight. Equally as they reach their geriatric years, illness and blunting of the senses of taste and smell mean it can be hard to maintain a good body condition.

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  • How diet can make a difference

    There's no reason why the later years in a dog’s life shouldn't be some of the most rewarding, even if your dog may be slowing down a little. With regular veterinary attention, daily care and proper nutrition, your dog can still experience a very happy, healthy life.

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  • What is cognitive dysfunction syndrome?

    As a rule, senior dogs tend to sleep for longer and slow things down in comparison to their younger or middle-aged years. However, some older dogs also start displaying changes in their behaviour that appear abnormal. Until recently such changes had been attributed to the aging process, for which little could be done. More recent thinking, however, attributes these changes to a disorder called Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS).

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