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  • Category Size Medium
  • SheddingModerate
  • Grooming RequirementsMore than once a week
  • AloneLess than 1 hour
  • Other PetsMedium
  • VocalNot too noisy
  • AllergiesNo
  • Suitability As GuardMedium
  • Dog Group Kennel Club Pastoral


This medium-sized, cobby dog has a medium-length coat that comes in orange and white; liver and white; black and white; tricolour, or roan (mixture of coloured hairs and white). Brittany dogs are 48-51cm tall and females are 47-50cm when fully grown. Their adult weight is around 14-18kg.


This dog, once called the Brittany Spaniel, is a French hunt, point and retrieve (HPR) dog, named after the Brittany region where he was developed. In the mid 19th century, British landed gentry, hunting partridge and woodcock, took their pointers and setters with them to the French estates where they interbred with the gundogs there. It's believed that a mixture of Gordon Setter, English Setter, and the Fougeres French Spaniel resulted in the Brittany dog breed, which is one of the most popular gundogs in France today.


The Brittany dog is an easygoing, affectionate, playful, and gentle family dog. Sociable with people and other dogs, he enjoys being with his family. Exuberant, lively and energetic, he loves to be in the great outdoors.


As with many breeds, the Brittany dog (or 'Brittany Spaniel') can suffer from various hereditary eye disorders, and hip dysplasia (a condition that can lead to mobility problems). Eye testing and hip scoring of dogs prior to breeding is therefore important. Epilepsy also occasionally occurs in the breed.


An energetic dog, with great stamina, the Brittany dog breed needs two hours of exercise or more each day. He needs mental and physical occupation and his versatility means he can be trained to enjoy all canine sports and hobbies – from flyball to field trials.


Your dog's diet needs to have the right balance of all the main nutrient groups including a constant supply of fresh water. It's also important to conduct regular body condition scores to ensure you keep your dog in ideal shape and remember to feed him at least twice daily and in accordance with the feeding guidelines of his particular food.


The medium-length coat is flat or slightly wavy with some longer hair (feathering) on the front legs and more profuse feathering on the back legs. A brush through twice a week should suffice. The ears should be inspected weekly and cleaned as necessary.
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