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Clumber Spaniel

  • Category Size Large
  • SheddingHeavy
  • Grooming RequirementsMore than once a week
  • AloneLess than 1 hour
  • Other PetsHigh
  • VocalUsually quiet
  • AllergiesNo
  • Suitability As GuardLow
  • Dog Group Kennel Club Gundog


The Clumber Spaniel is a large, strong dog, who is heavier and more substantial than the other spaniel breeds. When fully grown, he stands around 45-50cm tall and adult dogs weigh 29.5-34kg and females 25-29.5kg. The abundant, silky coat comes in white with lemon or orange markings, and the muzzle is freckled.


It's long been believed that the Clumber Spaniel is a French breed, brought to the UK over two centuries ago by the Duke of Noailles who, keen to keep his dogs safe in the revolution, gave his kennel of prized spaniels to the Duke of Newcastle at Clumber Park, Nottinghamshire. There is little evidence to fully support this theory and it's now thought that the Clumber Spaniel dog breed is very much a British creation, developed from various hunting spaniels and other breeds.


A little more reserved than some spaniels, the Clumber Spaniel breed is good-natured, and they make devoted family dogs - though be prepared for some slobber! He can show a stubborn streak, but usually loves to please, so makes a rewarding pupil when training, provided he has the right motivation.


As with many breeds, the Clumber Spaniel can suffer from hereditary eye disorders, and hip dysplasia (a condition that can lead to mobility problems). Eye testing and hip scoring of dogs prior to breeding is therefore important.


This breed is renowned for its excellent nose – something he will happily follow when out on a walk! For this reason, a reliable recall is essential for off-lead exercise. He is slower than the other spaniel breeds, and will be happy with about an hour's exercise a day.


Large breed dogs, as well as having large appetites, benefit from a different balance of nutrients including minerals and vitamins compared to smaller-breed dogs.


The abundant coat is silky and straight, and there is longer hair (feathering) on the legs and chest that will tangle if neglected. The feet should be trimmed to prevent hair knotting, and the ears should be checked regularly.
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