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Irish Red and White Setter

  • Category Size Large
  • SheddingModerate
  • Grooming RequirementsMore than once a week
  • Alone1 to 3 hours
  • Other PetsHigh
  • VocalNot too noisy
  • AllergiesNo
  • Suitability As GuardLow
  • Dog Group Kennel Club Gundog


The Irish Red and White Setter is a strong, athletic dog with a well-feathered, medium-length coat that is pearl white with red patches. Adult dogs are approximately 58.5-68.5cm in height and weigh around 27-32kg.


Closely related to the Irish (Red) Setter, the Irish Red and White Setter dog breed can be traced back to the 18th century, though it could well have existed before that time, as red and white hunting dogs are described in texts dating back to the 1500s. Setters were popular sporting dogs with the landed gentry in the 17th and 18th centuries, and most were red with white, but towards the end of the 19th century, an entirely red coat was favoured and the Red and White was in danger of dying out. Fortunately enough survived for dedicated breeders to revive the breed after the First World War.


A gentle, biddable, good-natured dog, the Irish Red and White Setter makes a happy, affectionate companion and is an enthusiastic worker too. As he is energetic, he does need an active owner to attend to his exercise needs.


As with many breeds, the Irish Red and White Setter can suffer from various hereditary eye disorders, and hip dysplasia (a condition that can lead to mobility problems). Eye testing and hip scoring of dogs prior to breeding is therefore important. They can also be prone to gastrointestinal disorders.


An energetic, active dog, the Irish Red and White Setter needs two hours or more of daily exercise, to include free-running.


Large breed dogs, as well as having large appetites, benefit from a different balance of nutrients including minerals and vitamins compared to smaller-breed dogs.


Brushing and combing the coat a couple of times a week is recommended, paying particular attention to the feathering (longer hair on the tail, backs of the legs, chest and tummy) which will tangle if neglected.
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