NPPE Breed Library Info Page

German Spitz Klein

german spitz klein

The German Spitz Klein is a small, compact, long-coated dog with a typical spitzy head and tail curled over the back. They can be seen in all colours and variations (see the breed standard for details). It should be obvious of the dog's sex – with males being masculine in appearance and females feminine. Adult German Spitz Klein stand at 23-29cm and weigh 8-10kg.

german spitz klein
  • Category size: Small
  • Grooming requirements: More than once a week
german spitz klein
  • Shedding: Moderate
  • Allergies: No
  • Noise: Vocal
  • Dog Group Kennel Club: Utility
german spitz klein
  • Alone: Less than 1 hour
  • Other pets: High
  • Stability as a guard: Medium

Origin

The German Spitz breed descends directly from the Nordic herding dogs, like the Samoyed, which were taken to Germany and Holland by the Vikings during the Middle Ages. These dogs then spread throughout Europe and were crossed with other herding/shepherd breeds, making the foundation of the Spitz type. By the 1700s, the Spitz became the fashion of British society and were bred smaller in Victorian times to produce the toy Pomeranian. The present-day German Spitz has two sizes in the UK and breeding between sizes is forbidden by the Kennel Club. However, German Spitz Klein will occasionally pop up in Mittel litters and vice versa because of the mixed ancestry.

Personality

The German Spitz Klein is a happy, friendly dog. A confident, even-tempered companion, there should be no signs of nervousness or aggression. They are very active and alert and love human company, liking nothing better than to be included in any family activities.

Health

The German Spitz Klein is generally a relatively healthy breed. Like many breeds they can suffer from hereditary eye disorders and therefore eye testing prior to breeding is advised. Epilepsy and kneecaps that may temporarily slip out of place also occur in the breed.

Exercise

The German Spitz Klein needs little exercise when compared with other larger breeds. About half an hour a day should suffice for an adult though he will happily accept more if it is offered. They do enjoy a run or a walk and will quite happily occupy themselves in the garden all day with their owners.

Nutrition

Small dogs have a fast metabolism, meaning they burn energy at a high rate, although their small stomachs mean that they must eat little and often. Small-breed foods are specifically designed with appropriate levels of key nutrients and smaller kibble sizes to suit smaller mouths. This also encourages chewing and improves digestion.

Grooming

As a general rule, a thorough brushing several times a week will ensure the coat stays clean and knot-free. The hair should be brushed 'the wrong way'. Particular attention should be paid to the ears and elbows where knots can occur more quickly. Males tend to shed once a year and bitches twice a year: this is when most of the hair will be shed.

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What to Consider next

Adoption

It is incredibly fulfilling to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or rescue organization. It often means offering them a second chance in life. There are many dogs waiting for a loving family, a forever home. Reputable centers will be very careful about matching the right people with the right dogs. Staff learns all they can about the dogs they take in, and will spend time getting to know you, your family and your lifestyle, before they match you with any of their dogs. They’ll also be happy to give you advice and answer any questions you might have before and after the adoption.

Finding a good breeder

If your heart is set on a pedigree puppy, then your best bet is to find a reputable breeder. Contact The Kennel Club or a breed-club secretary who may have a list of litters available, or should be able to put you in contact with breeders in your area. Try to choose a breeder who is part of the Kennel Club’s assured breeder scheme.Visit dog shows to meet breeders in person and inquire about availability of pups of your chosen breed.

Welcoming your dog home

Whether you’re bringing home a tiny puppy or rehoming an adult dog, this is a hugely exciting time for everyone. While you’re waiting for the big day you might need to distract yourself, so luckily there are a few things you need to sort out before you welcome your new arrival. Click here for more information