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Your Pet, Our Passion.

Norwegian Buhund

Medium sized with an attractively foxy face, the Norwegian Buhund sports the typical spitz features of pricked ears, thick, double coat and tail curled over the back. Despite being medium sized, the Buhund is quite a leggy breed and has a lighter frame than some spitz types. The thick coat is made up of a woolly, insulating undercoat and a harsh, smooth topcoat.

The need-to-know
  • Dog suitable for owners with some experience
  • Extra training required
  • Generally healthy breed
  • Enjoys active walks
  • Enjoys one to two hours of walking a day
  • Medium dog
  • Minimum drool
  • Requires grooming every other day
  • Chatty and vocal dog
  • Barks and alerts to visitors/anything unusual
  • Could have issues with unknown dogs but gets along with known dogs
  • Gets along with other pets with training
  • May need additional supervision to live with children
  • Needs a large garden
  • Can live in semi-rural areas
  • Can be left occasionally with training
Generally healthy breed

The Norwegian Buhund breed can be prone to: 
- Hip dysplasia 
- Hereditary cerebellar ataxia is a condition affecting the nervous system which can case uncoordinated movements and head tremors 
- Hereditary cataracts which is a condition where the lens in the eye becomes cloudy and this can result in blindness.

Priority Kennel Club health schemes and testing: 
- Hip dysplasia screening scheme 
- Eye screening scheme 

Key Facts

Lifespan: 13 – 15 years
Weight: 14 – 18kg
Height: 41 – 47cm
Colours: The Buhund comes in a variety of colours; wheaten, black, red or wolf sable. Some white markings are seen, see breed standard for details.
Size: Medium
UK Kennel Club Groups: Pastoral

Ratings

Family-friendly: 5/5
Exercise needs: 5/5
Easy to train: 4/5
Tolerates being alone: 4/5
Likes other pets: 4/5
Energy level: 4/5
Grooming needs: 3/5
Shedding: 3/5
Norwegian Buhund is standing in the yard and watching forward

Personality

Ideally suited to the active, dog-training/dog-sports home, the Buhund is a bold, brave and athletic dog. Not too big to be demanding to house yet still not so small as to be incapable of a variety of sports and activities, this is a ‘proper dog’.

They are inclined to bark to alert to suspicious activity or strange sights, and the shedding can be a serious downside for those who aren’t keen on vacuuming twice daily for 6 months of the year, so proper research is necessary before welcoming a Norwegian Buhund into your home.

With the right exercise and training this is an engaging and fun dog in a conveniently sized package.

Norwegian Buhund is having a nap near the Christmas Tree

History and Origins

Country of Origin: Norway

Originating in Norway, dogs similar to the Buhund have been found in Viking graves dating back to 900AD. Thought to be a close relation to the Iceland Dog, the Icelandic Sagas tell of a similar dog arriving from Norway in the 9th century, and these written and archaeological records give us a good idea as to how old this ancient breed really is.

The name Buhund translates as ‘farm dog’ as they were used as an all-round farm dog, performing multiple functions including herding, and watchdog and pest control, some are still used for this purpose today.

First brought to England in the late 1940’s following the second World War, more examples arrived in the 1950’s and 60’s. The breed received official recognition in 1968, and became popular in the show ring due to their unfussy appearance and lively, appealing nature.

Did you know?

Did You Know?

  • Their name is pronounced ‘boo-hund’ and ‘bu’ means ‘farm’ or homestead, ‘hund’ means dog – so ‘Buhund’ means ‘farm dog’.
  • Snorri Sturluson (1179 – 1241) mentioned the Buhund in his Viking Sagas, though it is likely he was discussing type rather than specific, recognised breed.
  • In the Viking Museum in Oslo there are preserved Viking ships, Gokstad, Tune and Oseberg – in the graves these ships were found they also discovered animal skeletons including those of spitz type dogs very similar to the Buhund.