Your relationship with your cat is based on a mutual choice. So how can you be sure she’s happy with the match?

As it is the owner's responsibility to take care of their pet's nutrition, health, comfort and training, we tend to think that choosing a cat is a one-way street. But despite this, a cat will always exercise her free will. For example, a cat will often show preference for one person in particular in the family, or even decide to come and live with you uninvited.

Understanding basic cat psychology and behaviour is important to help your cat happily settle in to her new home. Beyond the basics of food, she is driven by the need for security and comfort. Therefore, she’ll naturally bond closest with those who offer the most emotional balance and well-being.

An overly attached cat

An overly attached cat

Despite their independent nature, cats can attach themselves closely to their owners, and sometimes excessively. This is often the case with kittens that have been separated from their mothers before three months of age.

It is hard to resist when your cat seeks your attention, but allowing her to become too dependent can create problems. Over-attachment can lead to your cat becoming distressed when you leave her, which can result in behavioural problems such as urinating, excessive meowing and alopecia (abundant hair loss).

Understanding basic cat psychology and behaviour is important to help your cat happily settle in to her new home.
Understanding basic cat psychology

1984

Naturalist Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire establishes Ethology, the study of animal behaviour, leading to a better understanding of cat behaviour.

To help your cat become more independent, spend short periods of time away from her and encourage her to spend time with other people.