Grand Bleu De Gascogne

Grand Bleu de Gascogne

A large, impressive hound with a long, noble head and pendulous ears, the Grand Bleu dog breed has a distinctive 'blue' coat colour, created from black mottling on a white background. Adult dogs stand at 64-70cm and females at 60-and they weigh 32-35kg.

  • Dog suitable for experienced owners
  • Extra training required
  • Enjoys gentle walks
  • Enjoys walking an hour a day
  • Large dog
  • Minimum drool
  • Requires grooming once a week
  • Non Hypoallergenic breed
  • Very vocal dog
  • Not a guard dog
  • May require training to live with other pets
  • May require training to live with kids

Origin

Descended from the St Hubert Hound, a now-extinct Bloodhound-type of breed, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne dog breed dates back to Medieval times, when it hunted boars, wolves and bears in its native France. Today it is still used for hunting large game (deer and boar), and is very much a hunting dog for the specialist, rather than a pet.

Personality

This breed is known for his 'deep bay', one of the reasons why he is a specialist dog rather than your average pet – neighbours will not appreciate his vocal tendencies! He is something of a gentle giant – with the typically kind hound temperament and pack mentality.

Health

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is generally a healthy, robust breed with no widely recognised breed specific health problems.

Exercise

The Grand Bleu needs at least two hours or more of daily exercise. This dog was bred to hunt and is not happy if he's unable to follow his nose for miles and hours at a time.

Nutrition

Large breed dogs, as well as having large appetites, benefit from a different balance of nutrients including minerals and vitamins compared to smaller-breed dogs.

Grooming

The Grand Bleu dog has a no-nonsense short coat that requires very little attention – just a brush over once a week. His long, pendulous ears should be checked regularly, to ensure they are clean and healthy.

Best Dog Breeds for Children

While many dogs are traditionally thought of as being good with children , all dogs and children need to be taught to get on with and respect each other, and be safe together. Even so, dogs and young children should never be left alone together and adults should supervise all interactions between them.

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Is this the right breed for you?

All dogs have their own, unique personality, but there are some instincts and behaviours hat they’re born with. Try our Dog Breed Selector and find out which dog breeds better match your preferences and lifestyle.

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What to consider next

Adoption

It is incredibly fulfilling to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or rescue organization. It often means offering them a second chance in life. There are many dogs waiting for a loving family, a forever home. Reputable centers will be very careful about matching the right people with the right dogs. Staff learns all they can about the dogs they take in, and will spend time getting to know you, your family and your lifestyle, before they match you with any of their dogs. They’ll also be happy to give you advice and answer any questions you might have before and after the adoption. Click here for more information.

Finding a good breeder

If your heart is set on a pedigree puppy, then your best bet is to find a reputable breeder. Contact The Kennel Club or a breed-club secretary who may have a list of litters available, or should be able to put you in contact with breeders in your area. Try to choose a breeder who is part of the Kennel Club’s assured breeder scheme.Visit dog shows to meet breeders in person and inquire about availability of pups of your chosen breed. Click here for more information.

Welcoming your dog home

Whether you’re bringing home a tiny puppy or rehoming an adult dog, this is a hugely exciting time for everyone. While you’re waiting for the big day you might need to distract yourself, so luckily there are a few things you need to sort out before you welcome your new arrival. Click here for more information.