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Your Pet, Our Passion.

Clumber Spaniel

Despite their shorter legs, the Clumber Spaniel should be considered a large, strong dog. Heavier and much more substantial than other Spaniel breeds, the Clumber is also steadier and less frenetic in their general attitude to life.

The need-to-know
  • Dog suitable for owners with some experience
  • Basic training required
  • Need to be aware of potential health issues
  • Enjoys gentle walks
  • Enjoys one to two hours of walking a day
  • Large dog
  • Some drool
  • Requires grooming every other day
  • Chatty and vocal dog
  • Welcomes everyone happily
  • Generally friendly with other dogs
  • Gets along with other pets with training
  • Great family dog
  • Needs a large garden
  • Can live in semi-rural areas
  • Can be left occasionally with training
This breed may encounter health problems

As with many breeds, the Clumber Spaniel can suffer from:
- Hip dysplasia
- Elbow dysplasia
- Exercise-induced collapse which is a condition that can cause problems with nerve communication during exercise and can result in collapse.
- Entropion which is a painful eye condition where the eyelids role inwards. 
- Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye) which is a painful condition where the tear gland stops working properly.
 
Priority Kennel Club health schemes and testing: 
- Hip dysplasia screening scheme
- DNA test for Exercise Induced Collapse which tests whether or not a dog has the potential to be affected by this condition.

Key Facts

Lifespan: 10 – 12 years
Weight:  25 – 34kg 
Height:  45 – 50cm 
Colours:  Mainly white with lemon or orange markings and freckling to the muzzle
Size:  Large
UK Kennel Club Groups: Gundog

Ratings

Family-friendly: 4/5
Exercise needs: 2/5
Easy to train: 4/5
Tolerates being alone: 2/5
Likes other pets: 4/5
Energy level: 3/5
Grooming needs: 4/5
Shedding: 5/5
light colored spaniel standing on the grass

Personality

The Clumber Spaniel being heavier built is slower to mature than other spaniels and generally steadier all round. They are a good natured, affable breed, dignified yet amusing and willing to do whatever task you take the time to teach them.  

As happy on the sofa as they are following a scent, the Clumber makes a devoted family dog.

light colored spaniel standing on the grass

History and Origins

Country of Origin: England

The Clumber Spaniel is another breed with somewhat vague romanticised origins involving French nobility, English Dukes and revolutions, however there is little evidence to support such ideas.

The breed does owe their existence to the Duke of Newcastle and their name comes from his estate, Clumber Park where the Duke created his own particular type of heavy, steady Spaniel from the various hunting dogs available at the time. These may have included dogs imported from France, where notably, longer haired low slung ‘basset’ types were popular as these allowed huntsmen on foot to follow them without the need for horses.

did you know?

Did You Know?

  • Prince Albert owned 7 Clumber Spaniels, and King Edward VII commissioned Faberge to carve a Clumber, ‘Sandringham Lucy’ from Chalcedony, with rubies set as eyes. This was purchased in 1909 by the then Prince of Wales (later King George V) for £102.
  • While not quite as popular as they were in Victorian times, Clumber Spaniels still have their celebrity fans, with TV Chef James Martin having owned a Clumber named Fudge.
  • Clumber Spaniel’s are seen in artwork as early as 1788, where they appeared with the Duke of Newcastle and his hunting party in Francis Wheatley’s painting, “The Return from Shooting”.
  • The UK Kennel Club has deemed the Clumber Spaniel a vulnerable native breed and there’s less than 300 new dogs registered each year in the UK.
  • The Clumber Spaniel was one of the first official breeds recognised by the American Kennel Club.