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Your Pet, Our Passion.

Dachshund (Miniature Wire-Haired)

This is a long-backed, short-legged dog of diminutive height that everybody recognises. While small, the Miniature Wire Haired Dachshund breed is still muscular and powerfully built with a deep, broad chest and well-developed forelegs. They have a dense, wiry coat that comes in a range of colours.

The need-to-know
  • Dog suitable for owners with some experience
  • Extra training required
  • Need to be aware of potential health issues
  • Enjoys active walks
  • Needs under an hour of walking a day
  • Small dog
  • Minimum drool
  • Requires grooming once a week
  • Chatty and vocal dog
  • Barks and alerts to visitors/anything unusual
  • Could have issues with unknown dogs but gets along with known dogs
  • May need additional training to live with other pets
  • May need additional supervision to live with children
  • Needs a small garden
  • Can happily live in the city
  • Can be left occasionally with training
This breed may encounter health problems

The most common health problem seen in the Dachshund is related to their body shape - with their long backs and short legs they are more prone to spinal disorders and joint problems;  
Intervertebral disc disease: a condition where there is abnormality in the discs which act to cushion the bones in the spine. The discs can dislodge or burst, which puts pressure on the nerves in the spinal cord leading to back pain and weakness or paralysis of the limbs.
Angular limb deformities: caused by asynchronous growth of a pair of bones, which appear bowed or rotated and may result in pain and lameness.

Miniature Wire Haired Dachshunds are also prone to:
- Cushing's syndrome¹, which is where too much natural steroid hormone (called cortisol) is produced, leading to symptoms such as excessive drinking and tiredness. 
- Progressive Retinal Atrophy which is an inherited disorder where part of the eye degenerates and wastes away which can result in blindness.  
- Lafora's epilepsy which is an inherited condition where carbohydrates cannot be broken down resulting in toxin build up and nervous signs.

Priority Kennel Club health schemes and testing: 
- DNA testing for progressive retinal atrophy which tests whether or not a dog has the potential to be affected by this condition.
- DNA testing for Lafora's which is a type of inherited epilepsy.
- IVDD Scheme for Dachshunds

¹G. Carotenuto et al, 'Cushing’s syndrome—an epidemiological study based on a canine population of 21,281 dogs', 2019, Open Veterinary Journal

Key Facts

Lifespan: 12 – 16 years
Weight:  4.5 – 5kg
Height:  12 – 15cm 
Colours:  Range of colours
Size:  Small
Kennel Club Group: Hound

Ratings

Family-friendly: 4/5
Exercise needs: 3/5
Easy to train: 2/5
Tolerates being alone: 3/5
Likes other pets: 3/5
Energy level: 3/5
Grooming needs: 3/5
Shedding: 3/5
Miniature Wire-Haired Dachshund sitting in the flowers

Personality

This dog can be very independent and needs kind, consistent, patient training. Early socialisation is required in order to acclimate Miniature Wire-Haired Dachshunds to children, strangers and other animals. They are a breed that becomes very attached to their family and usually one family member in particular, but they can be reserved with strangers.

The Dachshund will suit an owner who may not have much space but wants a strong-minded, determined, one-person dog who will go everywhere with them - as the Dachshund does not like being left.

Three Miniature Wire-Haired Dachshunds lying

History and Origins

Country of Origin: Sweden

Dachshunds can be traced back to 15th century Germany. However, Dachshund-type dogs have appeared in ancient Egyptian and Mexican art and remains of a similar dog were found with shipwreck remnants in Italy, dating back to the 1st century AD. The German breed standard was set in 1879 and the breed club established in 1888. Dachshunds were exported to Great Britain with Prince Albert and became popular in Britain and America throughout the 19th century. Miniature Dachshunds were used in lieu of ferrets to hunt rabbits out of their warrens.

did you know?

Did You Know?

  • It is thought that a translation error is why this breed appears in the hound group and not the terrier group! Its German name means Badger Dog, but back in 1874 when the breed was entered in the English stud book, authors wrongly translated the German ‘hund’ as ‘hound’ rather than as ‘dog’. Many owners will agree that living with a Dachshund feels more like living with a terrier than a hound!
  • The miniature Dachshund is one of the most long-lived of all dog breeds.