Belgian Shepherd Dog Tervueren

Belgian Shepherd Dog Tervueren

The Tervueren is a medium-sized, long-haired dog that appears square in its outline. Although they are often confused with the 'long-haired German Shepherd Dog' by the general public, they are squarer in profile; lighter in bone with a more refined head. The Terveuren dog breed is fawn, red or grey in colour with black shading on the hair tips. Adult dogs should measure between 61-66cm and females 56-61cm. They weigh between 27.5-28.5kg.

  • Dog suitable for experienced owners
  • Extra training required
  • Enjoys vigorous walks
  • Enjoys walking more than two hours a day
  • Large dog
  • Minimum drool
  • Requires grooming once a week
  • Non Hypoallergenic breed
  • Chatty and vocal dog
  • Guard dog. Barks and alerts
  • May require training to live with other pets
  • May require training to live with kids

Origin

The Belgian Shepherd Dog comes in four varieties: the Laekenois, Tervueren, Groenendael and Malinois, named after the areas in Belgium from which they came. The Tervueren is closer to the Groenendael than the other two. It is believed that two 'black-tipped fawn long-haired' sheepdogs were crossed and one of the resulting litter was crossed to the foundation stock of the Groenendael. This litter became the precedent of the Tervueren. In the 1940s the Tervueren dog breed nearly disappeared altogether; however, in the 1950s interest was rekindled in the breed.

Personality

The Tervueren is an affectionate, devoted companion who will protect his home and family. As with all breeds with a guarding tendency, it is not advisable to encourage the guarding instincts when young, as they could start trying to guard you in inappropriate situations. Their natural guarding instincts will kick in if and when necessary. However, he has a great sense of humour and learns very quickly.

Health

As with many breeds, all varieties of the Belgian can suffer from hereditary eye disorders and hip dysplasia (a condition that can lead to mobility problems). Eye testing and hip scoring of dogs prior to breeding is therefore important. This particular type of Belgian Shepherd is also predisposed to epilepsy.

Exercise

The Tervueren needs two hours-plus of daily exercise and mental stimulation. Highly trainable, he can excel at agility, obedience and other canine sports. They are very active dogs and should not be considered as pets if they are to be left alone all day.

Nutrition

Large breed dogs, as well as having large appetites, benefit from a different balance of nutrients including minerals and vitamins compared to smaller-breed dogs.

Grooming

The Tervueren is a long-haired dog that needs a fair amount of grooming. They have a long, straight and profuse outercoat with an extremely dense undercoat. This undercoat is shed twice a year in the case of bitches and in males, generally once a year.

Best Dog Breeds for Children

While many dogs are traditionally thought of as being good with children , all dogs and children need to be taught to get on with and respect each other, and be safe together. Even so, dogs and young children should never be left alone together and adults should supervise all interactions between them.

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Is this the right breed for you?

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What to consider next

Adoption

It is incredibly fulfilling to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or rescue organization. It often means offering them a second chance in life. There are many dogs waiting for a loving family, a forever home. Reputable centers will be very careful about matching the right people with the right dogs. Staff learns all they can about the dogs they take in, and will spend time getting to know you, your family and your lifestyle, before they match you with any of their dogs. They’ll also be happy to give you advice and answer any questions you might have before and after the adoption. Click here for more information.

Finding a good breeder

If your heart is set on a pedigree puppy, then your best bet is to find a reputable breeder. Contact The Kennel Club or a breed-club secretary who may have a list of litters available, or should be able to put you in contact with breeders in your area. Try to choose a breeder who is part of the Kennel Club’s assured breeder scheme.Visit dog shows to meet breeders in person and inquire about availability of pups of your chosen breed. Click here for more information.

Welcoming your dog home

Whether you’re bringing home a tiny puppy or rehoming an adult dog, this is a hugely exciting time for everyone. While you’re waiting for the big day you might need to distract yourself, so luckily there are a few things you need to sort out before you welcome your new arrival. Click here for more information.