NPPE Breed Library Info Page

Bulldog

bulldog

The Bulldog breed has a short, sturdy body and fairly loose skin, especially at the head, neck and shoulders. Another distinctive feature is the large skull. The Bulldog can be brindle, shades of red, fawn or white with any of the aforementioned colours. The adult Bulldog stands at 31-36cm and weighs 23-25kg.

bulldog
  • Category size: Medium
  • Grooming requirements: Once a week
bulldog
  • Shedding: Moderate
  • Allergies: No
  • Noise: Usually quiet
  • Dog Group Kennel Club: Utility
bulldog
  • Alone: 1 to 3 hours
  • Other pets: Medium
  • Stability as a guard: Medium

Origin

Bulldogs come from the ancient breed of Bullenbeissers, a mastiff-like dog used for guarding and attacking wild animals in Assyria, Greece, Egypt and Rome. The Bullenbeisser came in various sizes. In England, the originally huge Bullenbeisser was bred to be a smaller dog and during the reign of King John (13th century) began its career as a bull baiter. Over the years, an ideal dog for bull baiting was created. Thankfully, baiting and dog fighting were outlawed in England in 1835, and Bulldog owners began selective breeding to eliminate the more aggressive elements of the breed and establish a good-natured family pet.

Personality

This is a family dog that loves children and will even learn to get along with other pets if introduced to them at an early age. The Bulldog is a bit too friendly to be a good guard dog but would defend a family member in need. He can be peaceful, pensive, goofy, stubborn, and have a well-developed sense of humour.

Health

The most common health problems encountered in the Bulldog relate to their very flat face, which results in obstruction of their airways and a difficulty in breathing. Over-exercising and over-heating is therefore to be avoided. They are also prone to skin infections, eye problems and hip and elbow dysplasia (joint conditions that can be painful and lead to mobility problems).

Exercise

Bulldogs should never be exercised in the heat of the day. Two relatively short walks, at a steady but not terribly brisk pace, should be adequate.

Nutrition

Your dog's diet needs to have the right balance of all the main nutrient groups including a constant supply of fresh water. It's also important to conduct regular body condition scores to ensure you keep your dog in ideal shape and remember to feed him at least twice daily and in accordance with the feeding guidelines of his particular food.

Grooming

The coat should be groomed with a rubber grooming mitt to remove loose and dead hairs and the folds may need cleaning. If the breed has a recessed screw tail, care should be taken to keep the tail base from becoming moist, as this will lead to bacterial infections. Another grooming measure that must be taken is the cleaning of tearstains and wrinkles.

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What to Consider next

Adoption

It is incredibly fulfilling to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or rescue organization. It often means offering them a second chance in life. There are many dogs waiting for a loving family, a forever home. Reputable centers will be very careful about matching the right people with the right dogs. Staff learns all they can about the dogs they take in, and will spend time getting to know you, your family and your lifestyle, before they match you with any of their dogs. They’ll also be happy to give you advice and answer any questions you might have before and after the adoption.

Finding a good breeder

If your heart is set on a pedigree puppy, then your best bet is to find a reputable breeder. Contact The Kennel Club or a breed-club secretary who may have a list of litters available, or should be able to put you in contact with breeders in your area. Try to choose a breeder who is part of the Kennel Club’s assured breeder scheme.Visit dog shows to meet breeders in person and inquire about availability of pups of your chosen breed.

Welcoming your dog home

Whether you’re bringing home a tiny puppy or rehoming an adult dog, this is a hugely exciting time for everyone. While you’re waiting for the big day you might need to distract yourself, so luckily there are a few things you need to sort out before you welcome your new arrival. Click here for more information